Gold Ridge Resource Conservation District

We inspire and partner with our community to protect the natural resources and agricultural future of our District.


Waters to Watch

The National Fish Habitat Partnership (www.fishhabitat.org) has unveiled its list of “Waters to Watch” for 2019. This annual list represents a collection of strategic conservation efforts implemented on rivers, streams, estuaries, and lakes to protect, restore, or enhance their current condition. These voluntary, locally-driven projects represent some of the top conservation activities in progress implemented by 20 regional Fish Habitat Partnerships throughout the country. These projects are carried out under the goals and objectives of the 2nd Edition of the National Fish Habitat Action Plan (2012).

The conservation projects are designed to conserve freshwater, estuarine, and marine habitats essential to the many fish and wildlife species that call these areas home. These examples of conservation have been fundamental to the overall success of the National Fish Habitat Partnership since 2006.  These conservation efforts are working to reverse persistent declines in our nation’s aquatic habitats. Having featured over 110 partnership projects since 2007, these “Waters to Watch” aim to show that science-based, on-the-ground conservation efforts can make a difference in improving fish habitat across the United States.

The United States Fish and Wildlife Service provides both funding and technical assistance to the 20 Fish Habitat Partnerships across the country to aide in implementing aquatic conservation projects nationwide. “We can’t do this work alone! We rely heavily on these 20 unique and innovative partnerships to help us improve fish habitat and achieve our shared conservation goals,” said David Hoskins, Asst. Director of Fish and Aquatic Conservation, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. “These projects are representative of some of the best collaborative initiatives in conservation today.” Said Ed Schriever, Chair of the National Fish Habitat Board. “The leveraging of resources through our partnerships is remarkable and proves that we can collectively achieve more to benefit fish habitat.”

People interested in learning more about the National Fish Habitat Partnership and partner projects happening across the U.S. can find out more information on how to get involved on our Partnerships page; http://www.fishhabitat.org/the-partnerships/.

The 2019 “Waters to Watch” list and associated Fish Habitat Partnerships:

1. Alexander Creek, AK – Mat-Su Basin Salmon Habitat Partnership
2. Amargo Creek, NM – Desert Fish Habitat Partnership
3. Coal Creek, WY – Western Native Trout Initiative
4. Crews Creek, GA – Southeast Aquatic Resources Partnership
5. Elephant Butte Reservoir, NM – Reservoir Fish Habitat Partnership
6. Megler Creek, WA – Pacific Marine and Estuarine Partnership
7. Spasski River and Hoonah Native Forest Partnership, AK – SE Alaska Fish Habitat Partnership
8. Sullivan Gulch, OR – Pacific Marine and Estuarine Partnership
9. Tainter Creek, WI – Fishers and Farmers Partnership/Driftless Area Restoration Effort
10. Upper Green Valley Creek, CA – California Fish Passage Forum

For more information on project maps and descriptions of the “Waters to Watch” list for 2019, Visit: http://bit.ly/2LodYvT.

More info here.

Check out #10 for more info about the Gold Ridge RCD partnership project located in Upper Green Valley Creek.  


Confronting the Challenges of Climate Change by Rattan Lal

Lal is a professor of soil science and Director of the Carbon Management and Sequestration Center at the Ohio State University.

This talk was part of the “Confronting the Challenges of Climate Change” symposium. The symposium on the topic of energy and the environment was held in honor of Theodore “Ted” Brown, the Founding Director of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology.

This talk was presented at the Beckman Institute of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign on October 16, 2018.


NRCS, UC Davis Announce Release of SoilWeb 2.0 App Update

USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and the University of California at Davis Soil Resource Laboratory today announced the release of the iOS and Android SoilWeb app, version 2.0. The app now has a cleaner and more modern interface with GPS-location-based links to access detailed digital soil survey data (SSURGO) published by the NRCS for most of the United States. The newly updated SoilWeb smartphone application is available as a free download on Google Play offsite link image     and Apple App Store offsite link image    .

“SoilWeb reached a new milestone this year when it was integrated with Google Maps and designed to scale across any device, desktop, tablet or smart phone,” said NRCS Chief Matthew Lohr. “SoilWeb app is a portable interface to authoritative digital soil survey data from NRCS, giving users access to practical detailed scientific soil information on the go.”

The SoilWeb app provides users with information relating to soil types that are associated with their location. The images are then linked to information about the different types of soil profiles, soil taxonomy, land classification, hydraulic and erosion ratings and soil suitability ratings. Identifying soil types is important to understanding land for agricultural production purposes and determining flooding frequencies and suitable locations for roads or septic tanks. SoilWeb provides gardeners, landscapers and realtors with information relating to soil types and how to optimally use the soil. Although soil survey information can be used for general farm, local, and wider area planning, a professional onsite evaluation may be needed to supplement this information in some cases.

More info here.